Tag Archives: Shabbat

Seventy Faces of Torah Rabbi Michael Rosenberg

Sacred Fat, Vulnerability, and God’s Choice

Parashat Vayikra (Leviticus 1:1-5:26) It’s the time of the year when I’ve got fat on my mind. We’ve arrived in the Torah reading cycle to the book of Leviticus, and there are a lot of fleshy, embodied, animal parts going on. We’ve got limbs and meat and blood; it’s a lot—for some too much—to keep track of. But I think that this year, it’s particularly important for us to think… Read Article →

Community Blog Rabbi-Sharon-Cohen-Anisfeld

“Betzalel came and healed the wound.”

Last week’s parsha, Ki Tisa, recounts what is quite possibly the lowest moment in the relationship between God and the people of Israel in the entire Torah. Last week, when Moshe and God became aware of the chasm between what was happening on top of the mountain and what was happening down below, it was devastating. Whatever made the people build that golden calf—whether it was lack of imagination, or… Read Article →

Seventy Faces of Torah Rabbi Alyson Solomon

A Practice: To Live Life as a Contribution

Vayakhel-Pekudei (Exodus 35:1-40:38) In parshat Va’yakhel we find the Israelites, convoked, regally assembled at the bottom of the mountain. Moses tells the community eleh d’varim, “these are the things” that connect us to YHVH – the Source (35:1-4). This we spend six days creating: we weave, paint, send emails, drive carpools, buy, trade, and cook—and on the seventh day, we rest. On Shabbat, we take in the beauty and grandeur… Read Article →

Seventy Faces of Torah Rabbi Mónica Gomery

Teaching God our Torah

Parashat Ki Tisa (Exodus 30:11-34:35) This week, revelation manifests as a rollercoaster in directionality, as Moses rises and falls from the base to the peak of Mount Sinai over and over again: “And the Lord said to Moses: “Go, descend, for your people….” (32: 7) “… On the next day Moses said to the people: “You have committed a grave sin. And now I will ascend to the Lord;” (32:30)… Read Article →

Seventy Faces of Torah Rabbi Adina Allen

Glitz, Glam and God

Parshat Tetzaveh (Exodus 27:20-30:10) “Holy Holy Holy is the Lord of Hosts!” Chanting these words in the Kedusha, we stand, feet together, mimicking the angels on high. As we press up onto our toes, yearning for that Divine connection, we take on the posture of these pure, ethereal beings without physical characteristics that exist only in spirit. Our conception of holiness often follows on this track, conjuring images of those… Read Article →

Seventy Faces of Torah Rabbi Adam Lavitt

Hope in the Margins

Parashat Terumah (Exodus 25:1-27-19) Speaking with a woman in hospice care, she told me she could not watch the news anymore because it depressed her too much. Though she was facing the end of her life, the turbulence of these times was utterly unbearable to her. In her despair I saw reflected back to me my own certainty, as I look into the public sphere, that our society is stuck…. Read Article →

Community Blog T Shalom 2018 Heather

The Value of Community

The tumult of work commitments, aging parents, children with different needs, nurturing relationships, and hobbies — how can anyone possibly balance all of that while caring for young children — not to mention caring for oneself? While Parenting Through a Jewish Lens (PTJL) doesn’t provide easy solutions, it does offer a framework for discussion and thought, a chance to delve into age-old wisdom and modern interpretations. As the instructor for… Read Article →

Community Blog Leah Raub and Gershon

Letting Our Values Lead the Way…

Parenting Through a Jewish Lens has been a truly introspective and transformative class. Not only was our instructor Jeff Amshalem a thoughtful and insightful leader, but were we surrounded by other parents who lent new ideas and camaraderie to the daily parenting struggles we so often sweep aside. Jeff encouraged us to look at parenting from various angles and pinpoint what our ultimate goals and dreams are for our children…. Read Article →

Community Blog Rabbi-Sharon-Cohen-Anisfeld

Speaking Torah: The Capacity to Understand

The command—not to oppress the stranger—is rooted in our own experience of strangeness.  It is repeated no fewer than 36 times in the Torah, but, in this week’s parasha, I imagine how it must have sounded to the ears of those newly freed slaves who stood trembling at the base of the mountain—exhausted, elevated, and called to radical empathy. Remember all that you have been through, and then translate it… Read Article →